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News — 30 July, 2016

Kickoff of HOT's Participation with the InAWARE Programme

The Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team’s (HOT) participation in the InAWARE program kicked-off last week with stakeholder workshops in Jakarta and Surabaya, Indonesia. The Badan Nasional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB) graciously hosted the event at their headquarters, which was lead by the Pacific Disaster Centre (PDC) and attended by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Disaster Management Innovation (DMI), HOT and various other stakeholders.

The Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team’s (HOT) participation in the InAWARE program kicked-off last week with stakeholder workshops in Jakarta and Surabaya, Indonesia. The Badan Nasional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB) graciously hosted the event at their headquarters, which was lead by the Pacific Disaster Centre (PDC) and attended by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Disaster Management Innovation (DMI), HOT and various other stakeholders. We were given an overview of the work, project plans and demonstrations of the disaster management tools involved in the project, which included InAWARE (PDC), PetaJakarta.org (MIT), the Tasking Manager (HOT) and InaSAFE (DMI).

 

As the program progresses, HOT’s planning approach looks at providing an accurate up-to-date map of key lifeline infrastructure and associated attributes in OpenStreetMap (OSM) for the cities of Surabaya and Jakarta. Indonesia has a population of 250 million and is the fourth largest country in the world, with the city of Surabaya home to 3.1 million and the expanded DKI Jakarta region home to 10 million. To tackle these densely populated cities, the mapping approach will be executed in 3 stages: importing existing open datasets; remote mapping of building footprints and road networks; and detailed data collection on the ground.

 

 

Datasets provided by the regional disaster management agencies, Badan Penanggulangan Bencana Daerah (BPBD) will be reviewed and validated for import into OSM, while the remote mapping will be coordinated by projects in the Tasking Manager, divided by kabupaten (district). HOT is currently looking to appoint a Missing Maps Community Partnership Manager to help engage the global community to assist with remote mapping events for the project and future programs. Once all the map buildings and roads have been digitised, the mapping team on the ground will add detailed attribute information such as building use, structure type, wall type, floor type, levels, and the condition with OpenMapKit.

 

The overall goal is to not only collect the vital lifeline infrastructure data, but to also work towards developing a simple streamlined data collection method that can easily be replicated and implemented for future mapping projects. A key focus of the project is to strengthen and expand the OSM community in Surabaya and Jakarta to increase public awareness and participation so that the data can continue to be edited and updated regularly by local citizens, which will be used by the national board of disaster management in Indonesia.

 

 

The city of Surabaya will be mapped first, starting in October 2016 and finishing in February 2016, before moving on to DKI Jakarta.